A New Cover & A New Version of Lady's Wager

Earlier this year, I received the rights back to my first novel which was published in 2008. I'm excited to announce the rerelease of Lady's Wager, a story of an heiress, a Viscount and a wager which leads to marriage. I've heightened the emotions and deepened the internal conflicts in this new version of my sweet, traditional Regency romance.
 I hope you'll please check it out. 
It's available on Amazon.

Lady's Wager is a well-written, classic historical romance.” – Joyfully Reviewed 


Charlotte Stuart is an heiress dedicated to charitable causes who's been betrayed by the false love of a fortune hunter before. Ridiculed by Paris society for her mistake, she vows never to fall victim to the weakness of love again. Driven back to England by the collapse of the Peace of Amiens, she enters London society and meets Lord Edward Woodcliff, a handsome Viscount in straightened circumstances. Falling for Edward means risking being humiliated again.

Edward has come to London to find a wife. Made leery of marriage by his father’s disastrous second marriage, Edward feigns poverty in order to find a woman who loves him and not his wealth. He loses his heart to the independent and spirited Charlotte, but her fear of being betrayed, and his hesitation to make a matrimonial mistake, prove difficult to overcome.

All seems hopeless until Edward challenges Charlotte to a wager. If he wins, he gains her hand in marriage. If he loses, then Charlotte is free of him. Charlotte accepts the wager only to lose her hand and her heart to Edward. Now Charlotte must put aside her fears of being betrayed by love long enough to let Edward into her life and admit he is the man of her dreams.


A Debt Paid in Marriage is Now Available!


Welcome to March everyone. My Harlequin Historical,
Is now available. Please check it out!

"Lee takes readers on an uncomplicated, but sexy romp...as Laura takes drastic measures to save her business." - RT Book Reviews A Debt Paid in Marriage


Laura Townsend's plan to reclaim her family's merchandise backfires when she creeps into moneylender Philip Rathbone's house and threatens him with a pistol, only to find him reclining naked in his bath! 

The last thing she expects is to see this guarded widower on her doorstep a couple of days later armed with a very surprising proposal. A marriage of convenience may be Laura's chance to reclaim her future, but she won't settle for anything less than true passion. 
Can she hope to find it in Philip's arms? 

Harlequin * B&N * Kobo * Amazon

The Romance Reviews 4th Anniversary Party


Thanks for stopping by from The Romance Reviews 4th Anniversary Party. Scroll down to read about A Debt Paid in Marriage, my March Harlequin Historical and to find the answer to my trivia question. Good luck!





"Lee takes readers on an uncomplicated, but sexy romp...as Laura takes drastic measures to save her business." - RT Book Reviews A Debt Paid in Marriage


Laura Townsend's plan to reclaim her family's merchandise backfires when she creeps into moneylender Philip Rathbone's house and threatens him with a pistol, only to find him reclining naked in his bath! 

The last thing she expects is to see this guarded widower on her doorstep a couple of days later armed with a very surprising proposal. A marriage of convenience may be Laura's chance to reclaim her future, but she won't settle for anything less than true passion. 
Can she hope to find it in Philip's arms? 

Harlequin * B&N * Kobo * Amazon



London—spring 1817

    ‘Miss Marston, please meet my intended, Miss Townsend,’ Mr Rathbone intervened, the stiff mask of business descending over Philip’s face and covering the faint hint of emotion Laura had caught.    ‘Miss Marston is Thomas’s nurse.’
  ‘Oh, Miss Townsend, it’s a pleasure to meet you.’ Mrs Marston’s smile was more surprised than relieved. Laura suspected she’d encounter many similar reactions in the days to come. ‘Mr Rathbone, Thomas awoke crying and nothing I do will calm him. You always have such a way with him. I thought you might come to the nursery for a moment.’
   ‘Yes, I will.’ He started for the door, then paused. ‘Miss Townsend, come and meet the gentleman who is part of our arrangement.’
    His command given, he didn’t wait for her. Mrs Marston wasn’t at all surprised by the abruptness and followed her employer out of the room.
    Laura walked behind them, the cries of a very young child growing louder as they stepped into the hallway. Mr Rathbone and Mrs Marston made steady strides for the door at the far end, but Laura’s progress was slower. When she at last reached the room, the sight inside amazed her. Mr Rathbone stood with the small child in his arms, a little face pressed against his coat, the tears soaking into the wool. One chubby hand clutched his lapel, wrinkling the perfectly pressed crease.
    ‘What’s wrong, Thomas? Did you have a bad dream?’ Mr Rathbone’s steady voice filled the quiet as he shifted back and forth on the toes of his boots. ‘You have nothing to worry about. I’m here.’
    His deep voice conjured up memories of her father holding her and wiping away her tears after a nightmare. It seemed like such a long time since she’d felt so safe and loved. His words curled around her insides, soothing her as they did the boy until she wanted to lay her head on Mr Rathbone’s shoulder and cry away all her frustrations and fears from the past year.
   ‘He has such a way with the boy,’ Mrs Marston murmured from beside her.
   ‘Yes, he does.’
    Whatever reasons she’d had for wanting to wait a month for the wedding disappeared. Too many things might happen in four weeks. He could change his mind and Laura didn’t want to go back to the stinking Seven Dials and the cold, lonely desperation which crept like the damp through those wretched rooms. Even if she never knew the same affection he showed his son, just being in the presence of such love eased the hopelessness and despair she’d suffered for far too long. She didn’t want to lose that.

Tea & Photography Gift Baskets

With spring just around the corner, a lot of silent auctions are coming up. Below are three baskets I've created for recent events. 

The first basket is a black and white photography themed basket. I took a number of coffee table books and some beautiful prints from the Museum of Photographic Arts and combined them with my 1935 Hollywood novel, Studio Relations. I also added a DVD of the movie Letters from Iwo Jima because the box is a beautiful sepia tone that goes with the theme of the basket. For fun I added two martini glasses and some black and white samples of Vox vodka and put in another pop of red with a small box of chocolate.



The second basket I did was a more traditional tea and books basket. I found a lovely blue teapot and a blue mug and added a tin of tea and a small jar of honey. Behind the cup and pot, I added a number of historical romances, including my Regency romance The Courtesan's Book of Secrets to help make someone's Saturday relaxing.




The last basket I did was for a Mardi Gras event. 


I don't normally photograph the baskets in the plastic, but as I was getting ready to run out of the house and drop this off, I realized I'd forgotten to take a picture. This was my contemporary romance basket. I included a bottle of wine, a tote bag, wine glasses, a notebooks, a hunky cowboy bookmark and a number of contemporary romances. I was told the by event organizers that this was one of their "hot item" baskets and very popular.

I hope you enjoy this little peek at the baskets I enjoy making and find some inspiration for baskets of your own.


For the Love of Books Hop





My favorite romance of all time is A Knight in Shining Armor by Jude Deveraux. A friend gave this to me in high school and I was hooked. I went on to read almost everything Jude Deveraux wrote. Here it is on my keeper shelf. It is a classic tale of time travel, love and redemption. This book was one of the many that inspired me to become a romance writer.


Book blurb


Abandoned by a cruel fate, lovely Dougless Montgomery lies weeping upon a cold tombstone in an English church. Suddenly, the most extraordinary man appears. It is Nicholas Stafford, Earl of Thornwyck…and according to his tombstone he died in 1564.

Drawn to his side by a bond so sudden and compelling it overshadows reason, Dougless knows that Nicholas is nothing less than a miracle: a man who does not seek to change her, who finds her perfect, fascinating, just as she is. What Dougless never imagined was how strong the chains are that tie them to the past…or the grand adventure that lay before them.

Check out Beck Valley Book's post to see the other blog participating in the hop.



Favorites Giveaway Hop



Thank you for joining me on my stop on the Favorites Giveaway Hop hosted by Stuck In Books. It was really difficult to pick a favorite book to highlight. Instead of one, I've chosen two which are often sold together, The Pursuit of Loveand it's sequel, Love in a Cold Climate by Nancy Mitford. The stories focus on the Radletts, minor English nobility and, like Downton Abbey, highlight the decline of the aristocracy in England after World War I, and women's changing place in society. The stories are told with a great deal of wit, some of it very cutting including this humorous passage from The Pursuit of Love.

"So we worked hard, mending and making and washing, doing any chores for Nanny rather than actually look after the children ourselves. I have seen too many children brought up without Nannies to think this at all desirable. In Oxford, the wives of progressive dons did it often as a matter of principle; they would gradually become morons themselves, while the children looked like slum children and behaved like barbarians."

After reading these two books, I went on to read about the Mitford sisters, the youngest of whom became the Duchess of Devonshire and owner of Blenheim Palace. Although learning about the Mitford sisters' personal lives led me to really dislike most of them, I did enjoy learning about Nancy's background and how it helped her craft her stories. If you want a more authentic look into a changing time period, then I encourage you to check out these two books.

Up for grabs are three ebook copies of Rescued from Ruin, my second regency romance for Harlequin Historical. Mr. Rathbone, the hero of my upcoming March release, A Debt Paid in Marriage, first makes his appearance in Rescued from Ruin. Check out the Rafflecopter below for how to enter then scroll down to check out A Debt Paid in Marriage, which will be out on March 1, 2015 and is now available for pre-order. The giveaway is open to international readers.

Thanks for stopping by and good luck!

a Rafflecopter giveaway


"Lee takes readers on an uncomplicated, but sexy romp...as Laura takes drastic measures to save her business." - RT Book Reviews A Debt Paid in Marriage


Laura Townsend's plan to reclaim her family's merchandise backfires when she creeps into moneylender Philip Rathbone's house and threatens him with a pistol, only to find him reclining naked in his bath! 

The last thing she expects is to see this guarded widower on her doorstep a couple of days later armed with a very surprising proposal. A marriage of convenience may be Laura's chance to reclaim her future, but she won't settle for anything less than true passion. 
Can she hope to find it in Philip's arms? 

Harlequin * B&N * Kobo * Amazon


Check out the other blogs participating in the hop!


Valentine's Day History

St. Valentine, we hardly knew you. Considering there were two different St. Valentines during the Roman era, no wonder there is confusion about who he really was and why he became associated with love.

Geoffrey Chaucer was one of the first to recognize in writing the connection between the Roman mystery man and romance. In his poem, Parliament of Foules, written in 1382, he writes

For this was Saint Valentine’s Day
When every bird cometh there to choose his mate.

It’s not exactly greeting card material, but it is one of the first written records of the day being associated with love.

After Chaucer waxed poetic about the day, others got in the game, creating little poems and cards to give to their sweethearts. The oldest surviving example is in the British Museum. It is a love poem from 1477 and you can see and read about it here http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/642175.stm


Later, in the 15th century, Charles, Duke of Orleans would offer a little ditty to his wife and further cement the connection between love and Valentine’s Day

I am already sick of love,
My very gentle Valentine

You can practically see Charles coming home from a hard day of oppressing peasants with a box of chocolates tucked under his arm to give to the little wife. However, the only chocolate available at the time was a bitter version of hot chocolate introduced to Europe from South America by the Conquistadors.

Romantic men all over the western world would have to wait another three hundred years before the little heart-shaped boxes went on sale. In the mid-1800’s, Richard Cadbury invented a way to mix chocolate and cocoa butter to make a sweeter, more edible chocolate. To sell his new creation, he offered them in fancy boxes and the Victorians snapped them up. Whether chocolate shops put them out the day after Christmas is still open to historical debate.

Along with these new-fangled chocolates, Victorians exchanged homemade Valentine’s Day cards. It wasn’t until an enterprising American woman, Esther Howland came on the scene that mass produced cards became available. Esther had started making cards by hand, but when demand for her designs outpaced her production abilities, she began manufacturing them in bulk. Now, husbands all across America and Britain could panic and rush to the store to buy a mass produced sentiment to go along with their heart shaped boxes.


So, as you write your cards to your loved ones, give a little thought to those who paved the way, and have a very happy Valentine's Day.
Please visit my website
http://www.georgie-lee.com/
for more great information on me and my books.