Sometimes I enjoy a little melodrama.

I've been home sick this week. As a result, I've been able to watch all four hours of The Way We Live Now, a BBC adaptation of the Victorian novel by Anthony Trollope. If you love Matthew McFayden as the handsome Mr. Darcy in Pride and Prejudice, you'll love him as the good for nothing Felix in this historic melodrama. The mini-series also stars David Suchet and Shirley Henderson. Unlike some Victorian melodramas, this one isn't over the top. Bad things happen to people but mostly because they bring it on themselves. Good does triumph over bad but not in a sugar coated way. I can't say the same about Daniel Deronda, another Victorian melodrama that I watched a few weeks ago. It had me rolling my eyes on more than one occasion. Sometimes there is such a thing as over doing it.

6 comments:

Amarinda Jones said...

I would be interested to know whether you liked the Colin Firth version of Pride to the Matthew McFadyen version better. I found the last one too contemporary. Any opinions anyone?

Georgie Lee said...

As much as I love the BBC version, I actually prefer the Matthew McFadyen version. Part of the reason I liked it was because the Bennets felt like a real family. Also, it wasn't as pretty as the BBC version, the clothes were not sparkling white and thing were dirtier. I agree it was contemporary at times but I thought it was a good interpretation of the novel.

Amarinda Jones said...

good point...I guess I just liked Colin Firth as Mr Darcy better

Elizabeth Kerri Mahon said...

I really liked this adaptation of the Way We Live Now, and not just because it showed another aspect of Matthew MacFadyen. I thought the cast was first rate particularly David Suchet and Shirley Henderson, and him of the blue, blue eyes Cillian Murphy.

Ms. Place said...

I haven't seen this production of The Way We Live Now. Oh, dear, and Matthew Macfadyen looks so handsome in period clothes.

Laura said...

I must see this - I love Trollope and thought The Way We Live Now ws really good. Tom Wolfe was inspired by it when he wrote Bonfire of the Vanities.