Another trip back in time.

This past Saturday, I attended the Victorian Ladies Society Annual June Tea with my mother and sister.
We dressed in our finest Victorian outfits, raised our pinkies and indulged in scones, finger sandwiches and petite fours.

The guest speaker was a Victorian costume expert who brought a number of fine samples of original Victorian dresses. She explained the shift in styles, from post-Regency higher waistlines to the late Victorian emphasis on the bustle. It was an interesting look at how fashion changed over the sixty-years of Queen Victoria's reign. It also made me long for the days of the bustle when a large rear end was prized by women of fashion.

Our own outfits were more Edwardian than Victorian because it's easier to put together an Edwardian outfit at the Salvation Army than it is to find suitable Victorian pieces. Thank goodness for the frills and lace of 1980s blouses. While our attire may not have been period, it did invoke the flavor of a bygone era.


Well, maybe not that particular era, but you get the idea.

4 comments:

Amarinda Jones said...

You know what I always wanted to know? Is how they hand stitched such amazing clothes. The nedlework was wonderful. And as for a bustle...what a strange thing that was - padding your butt so it stood out. I make sure I cover mine so it doesn't. I don't expect large butts will ever come back

Georgie Lee said...

What always amazes me is how not only was the hand stitching beautiful, but they were able to remake the dresses with each changing style. I think the fabric back then must have been much hardier than today. I wash an item of clothing a few time and it's history.

Amarinda Jones said...

Yeah but we are a throw away society. I believe people took more care with everything and they hand washed stuff.

Vic (Ms. Place) said...

Oh, what beautiful costumes. My grandmother used to remake her clothes, and I think you are right: fabrics were much sturdier and could take more "abuse" than today's cloths, which pill and tear easily.